New Book Tells How U.S. Soldiers Saved Works of Art During World War II

In the midst of the conflict, the Allied Forces appointed the monuments officers—a motley group of art historians, curators, architects, and artists—to ensure that the great masterworks of European art and architecture were not looted or bombed into oblivion. The journalist Ilaria Dagnini Brey focuses her spellbinding account on the monuments officers of Italy, quickly dubbed “the Venus Fixers” by bemused troops.
Working on the front lines in conditions of great deprivation and danger, these unlikely soldiers stripped the great galleries of their incomparable holdings and sent them into safety by any means they could; when trucks could not be requisitioned or “borrowed,” a Tiepolo altarpiece might make its midnight journey across the countryside balanced in the front basket of a bicycle. They blocked a Nazi convoy of two hundred stolen paintings—including Danae, Titian’s voluptuous masterpiece, an intended birthday present for Hermann Göring. They worked with skeptical army strategists to make sure air raids didn’t take out the heart of an ancient city, and patched up Renaissance palazzi and ancient churches whose lead roofs were sometimes melted away by the savagery of the attacks, exposing their frescoed interiors to the harsh Tuscan winters and blistering summers. Sometimes they failed. But to an astonishing degree, they succeeded, and anyone who marvels at Italy’s artistic riches today is witnessing their handiwork.

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5 comments on “New Book Tells How U.S. Soldiers Saved Works of Art During World War II

  1. Reblogged this on Greatpoetrymhf’s Weblog and commented:
    Art preservation in the heart of chaos

    Like

  2. Ivy Burmside says:

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  3. Its wonderful as your other articles : D, appreciate it for posting . “The rewards for those who persevere far exceed the pain that must precede the victory.” by Ted W. Engstrom.

    Like

  4. Cialis says:

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