OFFF Cincinnati 2013:OFFF’s founder, Hector Ayuso – curating the interactive exhibition

English: Offf Logos Deutsch: Offf Logos

English: Offf Logos Deutsch: Offf Logos (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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OFFF Cincinnati is an event for the entire creative community, bringing artists and designers from around the world to share their work and inspiration with you! What differentiates OFFF from other conferences is the passion and diversity of techniques that the presenters share, from analog and handcraft to cutting edge digital processes. Because of last year’s sold-out success, we’ve moved the conference to a bigger venue–theAronoff Center.

Once again, OFFF Cincinnati features some of the world’s biggest names and brightest minds exploring design and technology today, including coders, illustrators, motion graphic designers and more.

Presenters:
Sara Blake (New York)
Jon Burgerman (New York)
Brendan Dawes (Manchester)
Ramon Escolá (Barcelona)
Multitouch Barcelona (Barcelona)
James Paterson (Montreal)
Onur Senturk (Los Angeles)
James Victore (New York)
*Joshua Davis (New York) FRIDAY NIGHT PRESENTATION
*PARTY:  Friday, March 8
OFFF’s founder, Hector Ayuso, is curating the interactive exhibition, ON! Handcrafted Digital Playgrounds, to coincide with the conference. The OFFF Cincinnati celebration continues with the exhibition’s opening eventson Friday, March 8 at the CAC, where you can party with the presenters. The evening starts with a special presentation by OFFF super-star (and ON! exhibition artist) Joshua Davis, followed by a huge night of entertainment with Brooklyn-based DJ /rupture and cool participatory projects by Joshua Davis and Multitouch BarcelonaNOT to be missed.

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OFFF Cincinnati 2013 partners: Sterling Brands, AIGA Cincinnati, Deskey Branding, Interbrand, Landor Associates, LPK, P&G Design, Seemless Printing and ArtsWave Coporate Partner: GE Aviation.

 : $50 ($30 students) bit.ly/OFFFCincyTIX

When March 6th, 2013 9:00 AM   through   6:00 PM

 

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Corinne PONDELL Holt – Muhammad Ali Art Show

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MUHAMMAD ALI IN ACTION SERIES
“Float like a butterfly sting like a bee” eyes of an eagle, stomach of steel.  His humanitarianism, his dedication to Allah, his charisma, his confidence, his beauty, his will to win (even when being booed), and of course, his hometown, are all reason’s I have chosen Muhammad Ali as my subject for a series of drawings.

I became interested in boxing after watching an HBO special profiling the lives of two boxers about ready to fight each other.  There is an extreme passion, dedication, and discipline to prepare the body for the best physical condition it can be in, so as to beat and not be beaten.  The possible physical damage a boxer puts his body through is extreme.  As a figurative artist I find it absolutely amazing what these bodies endure and how they recover to preform again and again.

One thing that struck me as I watched the boxers fight in slow motion was how graceful the bodies looked as they danced together.  Dancing to find the right opportunity to make a swing most effective.  It is a perfect combination of violence and beauty, coming together to see who is stronger, who is faster, and who will ultimately win the match.  Finding a series of Ali’s fights on DVD, gave me a chance to watch him in action, frame by frame.  I selected the images I found most compelling and captured the power of his and his opponent’s bodies in water-soluble crayon, pen, charcoal, and soft pastels.  I’ve been involved with this project for more than a year and continue to be inspired by Ali as a subject.

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http://www.pondellfineart.com

“Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

Oregon College of Art and Craft Library:

 “Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

 Featured Artist: Michelle Ross

She is well known for her contemporary abstract paintings, which “[traverse] the history of abstraction, design, decoration and the love of language” (here). Her work has been likened to Mondrian, Hans Hoffman, Giorgio Morandi, Agnes Martin, Mary Heilman, and Robert Mangold. Ryan Pierce has stated that “Ross’ paintings are firmly grounded in the tropes and traditions of modernism,” they are “refreshingly free of the gimmicks that crowd a lot of abstraction these days,” and they “link the classical and the modern with grace and reverence, leaving plenty of open space for whatever happens next” (from a 2007 review on PORT).

More images of her recent work can be seen on the Elizabeth Leach Gallery website.

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 “Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

For this week’s library pick, we have selected a title that showcases many of Michelle Ross’ contemporaries and other artists pushing the limits of abstract painting. The book is Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting by Bob Nickas.

After a prefatory essay on the “persistence of abstraction,” the book is broken up into six parts: “hybrid pictures,” “Rhythm and Opticality,” “Color and Structure,” “Found/Eccentric Abstraction,” “Form, Space, and Scale,” and “the Act of Painting.” About a dozen or more artists have been selected for each section and a short text describes how each particularly addresses some issue related to that section’s theme.

For example, Nickas asks “Is the hand of an artist more visible to us when drawing and line are central to her paintings?” (139). He then demonstrates how this question can be answered in the “affirmative” by a close investigation on the work of Allison Miller. Several large, full-color reproductions of her work follow in order to illustrate his point.

Painting Abstraction is an authoritative compilation that addresses the key issues in the field of abstract painting from the last five years and profiles 80 different contemporary abstract artists including Mark Grotjahn and Amy Sillman. Bob Nickas work is an excellent balance of research, critical analysis, and, what all great art books so often have: art, art, and more art.

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British pre-Raphaelite barn owl painting discovery

British pre-Raphaelite barn owl painting discovered
William James Webbe (fl.1853-1878), The White Owl, 'Alone and warming his five wits, The white owl in the belfry sits,' signed with monogram and dated '1856' (lower left), oil on board, 17¾ x 10 3/8 in. (45 x 26.3 cm.) © Christie’s Images Limited 2012

From the Huffington Post:

Attic Owl Painting Sells For Nearly $1 Million At Christie’s Victorian Art Sale (PHOTO)

Posted: 12/17/2012 12:31 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/17/2012 12:31 pm EST

Everyone dreams of finding that one priceless item hiding in the corners of a dust-ridden attic. One UK teacher recently experienced the joy of rescuing such a forgotten antique, all thanks to an old owl painting that turned out to be worth nearly a million dollars.

Jane Cordery, an art teacher in Hampshire, discovered the detailed bird portrait in her attic after attempting to clean the space for a plumber. She’d never seen the ornate owl, but the painting’s intricate brushwork caught her eye and she decided to e-mail a photograph of the find to Christie’s auction house. According to the Daily Mail, One look at the owl and art expert Brandon Lindberg knew that that the work was worth much more than anyone suspected.

The auction house determined that the painting, titled “The White Owl,” was created by pre-Raphaelite artist William James Webbe, and experts valued the work at £70,000 ($113,449). Beyond the British masterpiece’s hefty price tag, it was also revealed that the UK’s Royal Society had exhibited the owl in the mid 19th century, exposing the piece to leading art critic, John Ruskin, who described it as “a careful study” with excellent brown wings.

The attic artwork hit Christie’s auction block last week, far outselling its estimated price — the winning bid was £589,250 ($951,050). Cordery maintains that she had never even seen the painting before her impromptu winter cleaning, while her partner, James Ravenscroft, remembers receiving the work as a present from his mother. “It’s a complete shock,” Cordery told the Daily Pioneer after the sale. “We were not imagining that in our wildest dreams.”

The owl depicted in the painting is a barn owl.

The motto of the painting is inspired by this poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

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Re-posted from (dearkitty1.wordpress.com) who nominated this blog for 2012 Best Blog!

Thank You. I am honored by this wonderful blogger! Of course I don't have all six stars, but as you can see by the re-post above why am so appreciative.

Thank You. I am honored by this wonderful blogger! Of course I don’t have all six stars, but as you can see by the re-post above why am so appreciative.

Denise Burge: Original Dirt (May 14 – September 4, 2011)

Denise Burge: Original Dirt (May 14 – September 4, 2011)

Denise Burge, Louise's Tree's, 1999

Denise Burge, Louise’s Tree‘s, 1999

Cincinnati based artist Denise Burge, approaching quilting from a painting background, views the creation of her work as its subject as well as its medium. Using the storytelling tradition learned in her community while growing up in the foothills of the Smokey Mountains, Burge uses her works as a commentary on everything from her family to the natural environment.
The Appalachian region has a history of folk artists concentrating on storytelling featuring aspects of religion, poverty, and the natural resources of the land. By using the quilt as her medium, Burge interprets what, to her, is a nostalgic and functional form of expression. Exploiting patchwork and sewing techniques as a vehicle for ecstatic pattern, Burge seeks to suggest her compositions as and analog to natural patterns of existence. Her work is constructed with a variety of materials and methods, both recycled and new, suggesting aspects of physical growth and renewal through the process. Shredding, slicing, layering, and turning forms and patterns inside-out, the artists sees her creations as a way to reenact and connect with the transformations that the earth constantly undergoes. Her nostalgia leads her to a romanticized conversation about attachment to our landscape. In the Appalachian landscape, people often see the brutality that can be exerted upon the earth, but also become viscerally connected to land and place as a natural resource and source of vitality. Burge uses her work to contemplate this contradiction and question the complexities of our relationship to our natural world.

Elmhurst Art Museum
150 Cottage Hill Ave.
Elmhurst, Illinois 60126
630.834.0202

Object Imprint artist, Denise Burge

Object Imprint artist, Denise Burge (Photo credit: a stitch in the ditch)

Go Obama!

Barack Obama

Barack Obama (Photo credit: philomythus)

Official photographic portrait of US President...

Official photographic portrait of US President Barack Obama (born 4 August 1961; assumed office 20 January 2009) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Who drove up the national debt? Give Obama four more years!