Anything You Have Experienced In A Regular Singing Lesson, Can Ignite An Amazing New Singing Ability Within You?

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K.

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jamon-WhiteIf you have ever taken singing lessons, or even online singing lessons, you have probably been exposed to singing scales. But have you ever wondered why singing training traditionally always involves singing scales? Would you also be curious enough to know why this process holds you back tremendously?

Most people who have taken singing lessons, or have read about how to sing better on the Internet, are encountered with the standard advice that you need to learn how to “breathe correctly” or use “stomach support”. You may have been told you need to “stand with good posture”, or that you should “place the larynx” in a certain position. Perhaps you have even been given instructions to “sing from your mask” or “feel as if you are yawning”.

Unfortunately, this well-meaning advice becomes exceptionally limiting – even destructive – for the majority of people trying to improve their singing voices. The reason will become abundantly clear when you watch the FREE VIDEO that you get on this page.

On the other hand, when you engage in a process – a process that you are about to learn here – through which you develop an extraordinary awareness of your body and mind, you can immediately FEEL the restriction your body and mind have unconsciously been holding on to. The beauty is that you also discover how to RELEASE these restrictions.

You FEEL how muscles that used to become engaged in the attempt to produce sound, can now let go. As a result, you can rather immediately sing with more power but with far less effort. Your voice becomes more flexible and your range increases rapidly.

Most importantly, you FEEL good!

Yes, it feels good to sing – just as it should. You also notice that when it feels good it also sounds good, simply because the sound isn’t restricted. And you SING ON KEY with much greater accuracy.

You now not only sound better than ever before, you can now sing with greater passion, in the style you want to sing. And with this newfound confidence and freedom you can truly bond with the audienceNow you become a singer who is attractive and captivating. Now the audience LOVES you.

… in your local choir or band… or when you sing by yourself for your own enjoyment.
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I found these video’s helpful; there are many out there to suited to our personal  interests . As an artist {painter}, as  noted in these  videos, in  expectation  of an  implied  talent.  people often say to me “how do you do that”… No, the  acclimation that talent is innate  may have been be overblown. There is  a lot of  practice, training via self or by an  expert. Admitting to myself to trust and let go, to not be a  champion,  at  will.. Sounds easy?  I have  found ; If   I make  mud out of all  my beautiful  paints–I make mud. Trust yourself. Love mud. Then do something  with  it-step back:  take a trip to the museum and look around  at  all  the mistakes, other  greats   that  you  admire.. Then start asking questions. Just like a child– it is the “why why why”. Looking is a great tool. Feelingly is a  great  tool. Creativity is a  great  tool. Hearing is a great tool.  Although  not equal, we all  possess  these  innately. Even a disability , pronounces itself in another voice. To one extent every gift  vacillates  over on other and each  “endeavor” over another over an other. Trying to do our best and not to be critical is one of  the  tools– I’ve  have had one of the greatest  wrestling matches with. Trying NOT to out think my ‘ intuition’  { what I  think I already know verse what I  don’t know}. What I don’t know is; one of my  greatest  assets { a learning device that  sounds like it has  ricochshaded  to the thousandths}. So  trusting myself when I am ready, when is it time is positive verse putative – the how the “why” can be intra- gated  after the self  interrogation…

…even if sounds like a ‘ learning  element’ that has been consecrated and impounded . Creativity, that has and is a questionable;  thoughtfulness, that keeps re-occurring  {as long as is cognoscente  and it is in an adverbially perspective}.  Feedback,  though  is quite astute in  our  memories.  Regenerate  from others, even with the best of intent, can be difficult and gestational. Perspectives help us sift  through our own filter’s and try to understand other’s.  No small challenge.  I would rather  eat  the  breakfast of  champanions. Cheerios‘s is  Cheerios. Therefore forcing us to value  to what we think or question, commits us to be makers or un -makers of our own  inviability  or the  spinnability of our audience.

Whether is  thought  or action is  congregational,  throughout  yourself,  myself  albeit  friends, a painting, a  memory, a song , a new attempt  of  bringing a  part of  history  albeit  politically antithetic, or a slight kinesthetic action such as shaking someone’s hand- is worth while.

For growth, impairment of even the greatest of our own attributes, is one of our greatest  strengths.

Singing is indeed for everybody

as  writing

as   fashion

as are political speeches.

as are  interpersonal  relationships.

and so forth…

So goes for creativeness.

and  love.

 

Write your first draft with your heart. Re-write with your head.

.

Singing Imageis joyful.

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Corinne PONDELL Holt – Muhammad Ali Art Show

FRAZIER_II_34_x49__Pastel

COOPMAN_44_x34__Pastel

MUHAMMAD ALI IN ACTION SERIES
“Float like a butterfly sting like a bee” eyes of an eagle, stomach of steel.  His humanitarianism, his dedication to Allah, his charisma, his confidence, his beauty, his will to win (even when being booed), and of course, his hometown, are all reason’s I have chosen Muhammad Ali as my subject for a series of drawings.

I became interested in boxing after watching an HBO special profiling the lives of two boxers about ready to fight each other.  There is an extreme passion, dedication, and discipline to prepare the body for the best physical condition it can be in, so as to beat and not be beaten.  The possible physical damage a boxer puts his body through is extreme.  As a figurative artist I find it absolutely amazing what these bodies endure and how they recover to preform again and again.

One thing that struck me as I watched the boxers fight in slow motion was how graceful the bodies looked as they danced together.  Dancing to find the right opportunity to make a swing most effective.  It is a perfect combination of violence and beauty, coming together to see who is stronger, who is faster, and who will ultimately win the match.  Finding a series of Ali’s fights on DVD, gave me a chance to watch him in action, frame by frame.  I selected the images I found most compelling and captured the power of his and his opponent’s bodies in water-soluble crayon, pen, charcoal, and soft pastels.  I’ve been involved with this project for more than a year and continue to be inspired by Ali as a subject.

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http://www.pondellfineart.com

“Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

Oregon College of Art and Craft Library:

 “Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

 Featured Artist: Michelle Ross

She is well known for her contemporary abstract paintings, which “[traverse] the history of abstraction, design, decoration and the love of language” (here). Her work has been likened to Mondrian, Hans Hoffman, Giorgio Morandi, Agnes Martin, Mary Heilman, and Robert Mangold. Ryan Pierce has stated that “Ross’ paintings are firmly grounded in the tropes and traditions of modernism,” they are “refreshingly free of the gimmicks that crowd a lot of abstraction these days,” and they “link the classical and the modern with grace and reverence, leaving plenty of open space for whatever happens next” (from a 2007 review on PORT).

More images of her recent work can be seen on the Elizabeth Leach Gallery website.

2011-12-05-michelleross

 “Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting” by Bob Nickas.

For this week’s library pick, we have selected a title that showcases many of Michelle Ross’ contemporaries and other artists pushing the limits of abstract painting. The book is Painting Abstraction: new elements in abstract painting by Bob Nickas.

After a prefatory essay on the “persistence of abstraction,” the book is broken up into six parts: “hybrid pictures,” “Rhythm and Opticality,” “Color and Structure,” “Found/Eccentric Abstraction,” “Form, Space, and Scale,” and “the Act of Painting.” About a dozen or more artists have been selected for each section and a short text describes how each particularly addresses some issue related to that section’s theme.

For example, Nickas asks “Is the hand of an artist more visible to us when drawing and line are central to her paintings?” (139). He then demonstrates how this question can be answered in the “affirmative” by a close investigation on the work of Allison Miller. Several large, full-color reproductions of her work follow in order to illustrate his point.

Painting Abstraction is an authoritative compilation that addresses the key issues in the field of abstract painting from the last five years and profiles 80 different contemporary abstract artists including Mark Grotjahn and Amy Sillman. Bob Nickas work is an excellent balance of research, critical analysis, and, what all great art books so often have: art, art, and more art.

2011-12-05-paintingabstraction

British pre-Raphaelite barn owl painting discovery

British pre-Raphaelite barn owl painting discovered
William James Webbe (fl.1853-1878), The White Owl, 'Alone and warming his five wits, The white owl in the belfry sits,' signed with monogram and dated '1856' (lower left), oil on board, 17¾ x 10 3/8 in. (45 x 26.3 cm.) © Christie’s Images Limited 2012

From the Huffington Post:

Attic Owl Painting Sells For Nearly $1 Million At Christie’s Victorian Art Sale (PHOTO)

Posted: 12/17/2012 12:31 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/17/2012 12:31 pm EST

Everyone dreams of finding that one priceless item hiding in the corners of a dust-ridden attic. One UK teacher recently experienced the joy of rescuing such a forgotten antique, all thanks to an old owl painting that turned out to be worth nearly a million dollars.

Jane Cordery, an art teacher in Hampshire, discovered the detailed bird portrait in her attic after attempting to clean the space for a plumber. She’d never seen the ornate owl, but the painting’s intricate brushwork caught her eye and she decided to e-mail a photograph of the find to Christie’s auction house. According to the Daily Mail, One look at the owl and art expert Brandon Lindberg knew that that the work was worth much more than anyone suspected.

The auction house determined that the painting, titled “The White Owl,” was created by pre-Raphaelite artist William James Webbe, and experts valued the work at £70,000 ($113,449). Beyond the British masterpiece’s hefty price tag, it was also revealed that the UK’s Royal Society had exhibited the owl in the mid 19th century, exposing the piece to leading art critic, John Ruskin, who described it as “a careful study” with excellent brown wings.

The attic artwork hit Christie’s auction block last week, far outselling its estimated price — the winning bid was £589,250 ($951,050). Cordery maintains that she had never even seen the painting before her impromptu winter cleaning, while her partner, James Ravenscroft, remembers receiving the work as a present from his mother. “It’s a complete shock,” Cordery told the Daily Pioneer after the sale. “We were not imagining that in our wildest dreams.”

The owl depicted in the painting is a barn owl.

The motto of the painting is inspired by this poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

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Re-posted from (dearkitty1.wordpress.com) who nominated this blog for 2012 Best Blog!

Thank You. I am honored by this wonderful blogger! Of course I don't have all six stars, but as you can see by the re-post above why am so appreciative.

Thank You. I am honored by this wonderful blogger! Of course I don’t have all six stars, but as you can see by the re-post above why am so appreciative.

Denise Burge: Original Dirt (May 14 – September 4, 2011)

Denise Burge: Original Dirt (May 14 – September 4, 2011)

Denise Burge, Louise's Tree's, 1999

Denise Burge, Louise’s Tree‘s, 1999

Cincinnati based artist Denise Burge, approaching quilting from a painting background, views the creation of her work as its subject as well as its medium. Using the storytelling tradition learned in her community while growing up in the foothills of the Smokey Mountains, Burge uses her works as a commentary on everything from her family to the natural environment.
The Appalachian region has a history of folk artists concentrating on storytelling featuring aspects of religion, poverty, and the natural resources of the land. By using the quilt as her medium, Burge interprets what, to her, is a nostalgic and functional form of expression. Exploiting patchwork and sewing techniques as a vehicle for ecstatic pattern, Burge seeks to suggest her compositions as and analog to natural patterns of existence. Her work is constructed with a variety of materials and methods, both recycled and new, suggesting aspects of physical growth and renewal through the process. Shredding, slicing, layering, and turning forms and patterns inside-out, the artists sees her creations as a way to reenact and connect with the transformations that the earth constantly undergoes. Her nostalgia leads her to a romanticized conversation about attachment to our landscape. In the Appalachian landscape, people often see the brutality that can be exerted upon the earth, but also become viscerally connected to land and place as a natural resource and source of vitality. Burge uses her work to contemplate this contradiction and question the complexities of our relationship to our natural world.

Elmhurst Art Museum
150 Cottage Hill Ave.
Elmhurst, Illinois 60126
630.834.0202

Object Imprint artist, Denise Burge

Object Imprint artist, Denise Burge (Photo credit: a stitch in the ditch)

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright: Poem By William Blake

The artist and poet William Blake, who lived i...

The artist and poet William Blake, who lived in Hercules Road — a portrait by Thomas Phillips (1807). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

June 28, 2012

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

The Tyger

By William Blake

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

The Tyger

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies

Burnt the fire of thine eyes?

On what wings dare he aspire?

What the hand dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, and what art,

Could twist the sinews of thy heart?

And when thy heart began to beat,

What dread hand? and what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain?

In what furnace was thy brain?

What the anvil? what dread grasp

Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,

And watered heaven with their tears,

Did he smile his work to see?

Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye,

Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

For more go to:

http://awildernesswithin.wordpress.com/2012/06/28/tyger-tyger-burning-bright/

Quotes:Carl Sandburg quotes (American Historian, Poet and Novelist, 1878-1967)

“Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.”

Painting by Heather Whitley Gibson 2000