Anything You Have Experienced In A Regular Singing Lesson, Can Ignite An Amazing New Singing Ability Within You?

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K.

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jamon-WhiteIf you have ever taken singing lessons, or even online singing lessons, you have probably been exposed to singing scales. But have you ever wondered why singing training traditionally always involves singing scales? Would you also be curious enough to know why this process holds you back tremendously?

Most people who have taken singing lessons, or have read about how to sing better on the Internet, are encountered with the standard advice that you need to learn how to “breathe correctly” or use “stomach support”. You may have been told you need to “stand with good posture”, or that you should “place the larynx” in a certain position. Perhaps you have even been given instructions to “sing from your mask” or “feel as if you are yawning”.

Unfortunately, this well-meaning advice becomes exceptionally limiting – even destructive – for the majority of people trying to improve their singing voices. The reason will become abundantly clear when you watch the FREE VIDEO that you get on this page.

On the other hand, when you engage in a process – a process that you are about to learn here – through which you develop an extraordinary awareness of your body and mind, you can immediately FEEL the restriction your body and mind have unconsciously been holding on to. The beauty is that you also discover how to RELEASE these restrictions.

You FEEL how muscles that used to become engaged in the attempt to produce sound, can now let go. As a result, you can rather immediately sing with more power but with far less effort. Your voice becomes more flexible and your range increases rapidly.

Most importantly, you FEEL good!

Yes, it feels good to sing – just as it should. You also notice that when it feels good it also sounds good, simply because the sound isn’t restricted. And you SING ON KEY with much greater accuracy.

You now not only sound better than ever before, you can now sing with greater passion, in the style you want to sing. And with this newfound confidence and freedom you can truly bond with the audienceNow you become a singer who is attractive and captivating. Now the audience LOVES you.

… in your local choir or band… or when you sing by yourself for your own enjoyment.
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I found these video’s helpful; there are many out there to suited to our personal  interests . As an artist {painter}, as  noted in these  videos, in  expectation  of an  implied  talent.  people often say to me “how do you do that”… No, the  acclimation that talent is innate  may have been be overblown. There is  a lot of  practice, training via self or by an  expert. Admitting to myself to trust and let go, to not be a  champion,  at  will.. Sounds easy?  I have  found ; If   I make  mud out of all  my beautiful  paints–I make mud. Trust yourself. Love mud. Then do something  with  it-step back:  take a trip to the museum and look around  at  all  the mistakes, other  greats   that  you  admire.. Then start asking questions. Just like a child– it is the “why why why”. Looking is a great tool. Feelingly is a  great  tool. Creativity is a  great  tool. Hearing is a great tool.  Although  not equal, we all  possess  these  innately. Even a disability , pronounces itself in another voice. To one extent every gift  vacillates  over on other and each  “endeavor” over another over an other. Trying to do our best and not to be critical is one of  the  tools– I’ve  have had one of the greatest  wrestling matches with. Trying NOT to out think my ‘ intuition’  { what I  think I already know verse what I  don’t know}. What I don’t know is; one of my  greatest  assets { a learning device that  sounds like it has  ricochshaded  to the thousandths}. So  trusting myself when I am ready, when is it time is positive verse putative – the how the “why” can be intra- gated  after the self  interrogation…

…even if sounds like a ‘ learning  element’ that has been consecrated and impounded . Creativity, that has and is a questionable;  thoughtfulness, that keeps re-occurring  {as long as is cognoscente  and it is in an adverbially perspective}.  Feedback,  though  is quite astute in  our  memories.  Regenerate  from others, even with the best of intent, can be difficult and gestational. Perspectives help us sift  through our own filter’s and try to understand other’s.  No small challenge.  I would rather  eat  the  breakfast of  champanions. Cheerios‘s is  Cheerios. Therefore forcing us to value  to what we think or question, commits us to be makers or un -makers of our own  inviability  or the  spinnability of our audience.

Whether is  thought  or action is  congregational,  throughout  yourself,  myself  albeit  friends, a painting, a  memory, a song , a new attempt  of  bringing a  part of  history  albeit  politically antithetic, or a slight kinesthetic action such as shaking someone’s hand- is worth while.

For growth, impairment of even the greatest of our own attributes, is one of our greatest  strengths.

Singing is indeed for everybody

as  writing

as   fashion

as are political speeches.

as are  interpersonal  relationships.

and so forth…

So goes for creativeness.

and  love.

 

Write your first draft with your heart. Re-write with your head.

.

Singing Imageis joyful.

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Should Historians “Mind” What’s Been Said? By mcheesaker

who's word's?

According to Google’s new n-gram tool, when researching history, words count.

Literally.

By analyzing over 500 billion words from 5.2 million books in Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish, the n-gram tool allows users to track the usage of words from 1500AD onwards. The implications of this tool in terms of historical and cultural research are just beginning to come to light. In the article  “Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books,” Jean-Baptiste Michel and his fellow researchers suggest that Google’s n-gram can be used to track the emergence of diseases, state censorship and the relative “celebrity” of a given person.

There is no doubt that the n-gram is, and will continue to be, an extremely useful tool in historical inquiry. However, there are some limitations that need to be addressed.

Firstly, the Google n-gram is limited in regards to language. Most of the collected works are written in English. Although this is helpful for me (an Anglophone student from Canada), some of the world’s most spoken languages, like Arabic and Hindi, are not even present in the database.

Furthermore, as Jean-Baptiste Michel notes, the Google n-gram tool simply measures the frequency of words within books, and books alone. Therefore, other publications like newspapers, and academic journal articles are marginalized from each search. The impact of this becomes quite clear when you compare n-gram searches on Google, and an n-gram search that browses through local newspaper clippings like the site, Mining the Dispatch. On Mining the Dispatch, users are able to see the relative frequency of fugitive slave ads that made it into the local Richmond newspaper during the Civil War. Because of its larger scope, and inability to browse through newspapers, this kind of historical deduction cannot be made through Google’s n-gram.

There is no doubt that the n-gram is, and will continue to be, an extremely useful tool in historical inquiry. However, there are some limitations that need to be addressed.

Firstly, the Google n-gram is limited in regards to language. Most of the collected works are written in English. Although this is helpful for me (an Anglophone student from Canada), some of the world’s most spoken languages, like Arabic and Hindi, are not even present in the database

I think it’s also important to note that language, although an important (and often forgotten) indication of culture is certainly not the only one. As historians know, geography, religion and class, all play a critical role in shaping the thoughts, actions and mindsets of a given people. Language is only one small piece of what makes us who we are.

Indeed, Canada, the United States, and the UK, may all be English speaking nations, but we have very different cultures. Just to prove this point, I decided to gauge the relative frequencies of three major sports: baseball, hockey, and football. From 1900-2008, the frequency of hockey was dismal compared to football and baseball. However, this was a search that took into account all English books written during the designated period. I imagine if I were to search a corpus containing only Canadian books, hockey would be mentioned far more frequently..

But more than that, words themselves are limited.

Think about Twitter. Depending on the words we choose to use in our hashtags, our statuses are more searchable. Similarly, if we tweet about a topic that’s trending, what we say is viewed by a larger audience. But what if we don’t use the right words to categorize what we’re saying? What if we type in an extra “s” or add an apostrophe where it doesn’t belong? But more pertinent than that, what if we say one thing, and mean another?

My previous example with sports provides an interesting example. In English, the word “football” can either mean soccer, or American football. In my search, this discrepancy wasn’t accounted for. Therefore, any mention of the word “football,” whether that book was actually talking about soccer or American football, was nonetheless counted. And therein lies another problem with Google’s n-gram: the tool gives us no sense of context.

And for the historian, context is king.

An old Chinese proverb claims that, “If you wish to know the mind of a man, listen to his words.”

After playing around with the Google n-gram, and uncovering its uses, I think this is extremely accurate. However, words are only one investigative tool in the proverbial historical tool-belt that can be used to understand history and culture.

F0r charts and more information visit: http://hist291.wordpress.com/2013/02/03/should-historians-mind-whats-been-said/

Corinne PONDELL Holt – Muhammad Ali Art Show

FRAZIER_II_34_x49__Pastel

COOPMAN_44_x34__Pastel

MUHAMMAD ALI IN ACTION SERIES
“Float like a butterfly sting like a bee” eyes of an eagle, stomach of steel.  His humanitarianism, his dedication to Allah, his charisma, his confidence, his beauty, his will to win (even when being booed), and of course, his hometown, are all reason’s I have chosen Muhammad Ali as my subject for a series of drawings.

I became interested in boxing after watching an HBO special profiling the lives of two boxers about ready to fight each other.  There is an extreme passion, dedication, and discipline to prepare the body for the best physical condition it can be in, so as to beat and not be beaten.  The possible physical damage a boxer puts his body through is extreme.  As a figurative artist I find it absolutely amazing what these bodies endure and how they recover to preform again and again.

One thing that struck me as I watched the boxers fight in slow motion was how graceful the bodies looked as they danced together.  Dancing to find the right opportunity to make a swing most effective.  It is a perfect combination of violence and beauty, coming together to see who is stronger, who is faster, and who will ultimately win the match.  Finding a series of Ali’s fights on DVD, gave me a chance to watch him in action, frame by frame.  I selected the images I found most compelling and captured the power of his and his opponent’s bodies in water-soluble crayon, pen, charcoal, and soft pastels.  I’ve been involved with this project for more than a year and continue to be inspired by Ali as a subject.

_MG_3623 _MG_3624

_MG_3630

http://www.pondellfineart.com

Quotes:Carl Sandburg quotes (American Historian, Poet and Novelist, 1878-1967)

“Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.”

Painting by Heather Whitley Gibson 2000

Tigergrove Now Joined With Flattr.Com

Flattr is the worlds first social micro-payment system

The idea had already been initiated in 2007, but the first release was in 2010 due to typical geeky laziness.

Flattr was founded to help people share money, not just content. Before Flattr, the only reasonable way to donate has been to use Paypal or other systems to send money to people. The threshold for this is quite high. People would just ignore the option to send donations if it wasn’t for a really important cause. Sending just a small sum has always been a pain in the ass. Who would ever even login to a payment system just to donate €0.01? And €10 was just too high for just one blog entry we liked…

Flattr solves this issue. When you’re registered to flattr, you pay a small monthly fee. You set the amount yourself. At the end of the month, that fee is divided between all the things you flattered. You’re always logged in to the account. That means that giving someone some flattr-love is just a button away. And you should! Clicking one more button doesn’t add to your fee, it just divides the fee between more people! Flattr tries to encourage people to share. Not only pieces of content, but also some money to support the people who created them. With love!

Flattr has no different user types. We know that everybody that create also uses other content. And vice versa. We make no difference between people.

Flattr can be used as a complement to accepting donations. Or to having advertising on your blog. Or to help getting small donations you never get for your open source software.

To Start A Flattr Account And Donate Click On: Flattr.Com

Quote:

“A man can be himself only so long as he is alone; and if hes does not love solitude, he will not love freedom; for it is only when he is alone that he is really free.”
 My ideas usually come not at my desk writing but in the midst of living.
Anais Nin  
                                                                                                                                                   
Painting by Heather Whitley Gibson

Art History: Bauhaus 1897-1993:

Bauhaus Dessau Workshop

Bauhaus Dessau Workshop (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Heinrich Neuy, 60 x 81cm, Druck , li....

Deutsch: Heinrich Neuy, 60 x 81cm, Druck , li. o. signiert “Heinrich Neuy” und Monogramm HN 1984. 37/50. Aus der Reihe Freidrich Becker kinetische Objekte 1985 in den Räumen der Zeitschrift “Symbol” in Köln. Privatbesitz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Direct artists into a new machine age by marrying art and industry. The process started in 1897 with Art & Craft workshops in Germany and ended in 1933. Bauhaus is not unique. Its principal aim was to bring together ideas from of art and industry.

The main idea was to improve manufacturing in order to improve the quality of life in Germany and create products for export. They had to have a German identity.

Kirchner’s Bathers at Moritzburgm – Expressionism and Jugendstil, he tried to create a unique German art. In Germany artists were all aware of the importance of design and were all trained in Arts & Crafts. This meant no life classes and no copying old masters.

Peter Behrens AEG logo and unique AEG fan.

William Morris felt the machine alienated the worker so he wanted all his goods to be handmade but this was utopian as they were so expensive only the upper classes could buy his work and this was in conflict with his desire to create beautiful goods for everybody.

The German approach was very different as the German Government held been involved in Arts & Crafts since unification (1866 and 1870-71). They wanted to put money into the project and make it successful so it became better known than in England. Their ideas were therefore applied to industry rather than being utopian.

The Bauhaus was a coalition of existing authorities in Weimar. They asked Walter Gropius to head the new art academy – the old Fine Arts School and the Arts & Crafts school. They would learn both skills and work with industry and create products that could be mass produced supported by the Government.

They looked at Morris ‘s medieval – inspired designs but applied it to mass culture. The New Weimar republic post – war brought a new idealism. Gropius ‘s experience during the war caused him to employ painters with utopian leanings.

Gropius was an established architect – he had designed a locomotive, factory and office building. He married craftsmanship with modem materials. He had a utopian idea that architecture could bring together all the arts. He thought Bauhaus would contribute to post – war society.

He introduced a guild system – lecturers were called masters, first year students apprentices and second year journeyman. A medieval craft guild system. The school was divided into workshops – metal, wood, stained glass, colour, textiles, stone and clay. There was also a theatre workshop. Wagnerian ideal of the totalkunstwerk of uniting all the arts. Futurists and the Expressionists also had this idea of uniting all the arts.

Each workshop had a master of form and a workshop master (creativity and the practiced application).

The ultimate of the programme was building. Students were encouraged to experiment with different materials.

Initially students were trained for three years. A small number of students could extend their training to become masters. There was supposed to be no hierarchy. The course outline used a circular scheme. It was unlike traditional art training

A large number of female students were accepted unlike traditional art colleges. Elsewhere females were not accepted into life classes until the late 19.

Areas they felt suited the female nature – intuitive, weaving, looms were brought into the colleges.

Johannes ltten (Eaten) was one of the first masters of form. He wanted to free the hidden talents of the student rather than impose ideas. He was interested in Eastern religions � he introduced breathing exercises before class and dance. He got students to students reduce old masters to blocks of colour. He was Utopian and mystical. There was a clash between utopianism and the manufacture of goods. So he resigned in 1923 after an argument with Gropius

Kandinsky and Klee were also interested in mysticism and utopian ideas.

The book Point and Line to Plane by Kandinsky explained the spiritual association of form and colour. So blue was a circle, red a square and yellow a triangle. Intermediate forms had intermediate colours.  Angles were deemed to have a certain temperature 90 degrees was red, smaller angles yellow, larger cooler.He wrote a colour theory that also linked colour to sound.

Moholy-Nagy was appointed as a much more practical director as Gropius had sold very little in the first three years. Moholy-Nagy replaced Itten. He was influenced by the Constructivists in Russia and wanted to link art and industry.

His medium was photography (see famous photograph looking down from a radio tower).

Moholy-Nagy was much more practical and he introduced distinct design ideas and typography (very distinct and became a symbol of the Bauhaus). He introduced a photographic course from 1923. He produced some very significant works (see photomontage of eyes in palms of hands before a city, alienation. Also see Kranz ‘s superimposition of portrait and Bauhaus).

In 1923 he opened an exhibition that included a model house Hans am Horn. This was very significant as it was designed for the modern middle – class. The purpose was to make life easy for the inhabitants. The living room was an open space for the whole family. The kitchen was the first fitted kitchen worldwide. The children ‘s room had blackboards on the walls and toy boxes that became tables and chairs. These were all firsts and common today. The fitted kitchen, cupboards and so on were all designed to be easily mass produced. The house did away with ornamentation, it was a minimalist house.

Political events in Weimar 1919-1925 were significant and ran parallel with the Bauhaus. There was a very strong local resistance to having the school there. An extreme right wing local government accused Bauhaus of left wing and revolutionary tendencies. The life of the Bauhaus students was Bohemian and threatening to the locals. Gropius was accused of favouring Jewish students.

Gropius designed a memorial to the dead leftwing strikers of 1921. In 1923 his house was searched. In 1924 all funding was withdrawn. The school was moved to Dessau (north east on the way to Berlin, an industrial city).

They all designed the new building. Moholy-Nagy designed the lighting, Gropius the building. It used modern materials and was practical. He also designed the staff accommodation.

The old guild method was abolished and each workshop now had one professor. The school began designing useful goods, such as table lamps, tea infusers, chairs (the famous Wassily (Vaseely]) chair made of steel tubes with two stripes as the seat. They had funding from Dessau but also started generating income from designs. Ruth Hallos carpet design. (gobelin). Also Gunter Stolzl encouraged consumers to put up textile wall hangings. Consumer goods became highly desirable in the late 1920s. Typography workshop was influential. They favoured lower case letters against the German system of capitalizing all nouns. Smooth, clean, clinical typography. It was very provocative to challenge the German language itself. Moholy-Nagy was a very political person who wanted to challenge the state. Bauhaus follows the rise of the Nazi party. When the Nazi’s took control of Dessau in 1924 they moved to Berlin but lasted only one year when in 1925 Hitler took control of the country. It was immediately closed as it was accused of harbouring Jews and left-wingers. Most staff and students went to the US and founded a school in Chicago. Compare with Constructivists as they had similar ideas. The majority of the artists had been to Russia in the early 1920’s. It is important to note the similarities.

 

resource: http://www.artnet.com/artwork/426150585/168763/laszlo-moholy-nagy-untitled-positive-photogram.html