Anything You Have Experienced In A Regular Singing Lesson, Can Ignite An Amazing New Singing Ability Within You?

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K.

Cheerios packaging sold in the U.K. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jamon-WhiteIf you have ever taken singing lessons, or even online singing lessons, you have probably been exposed to singing scales. But have you ever wondered why singing training traditionally always involves singing scales? Would you also be curious enough to know why this process holds you back tremendously?

Most people who have taken singing lessons, or have read about how to sing better on the Internet, are encountered with the standard advice that you need to learn how to “breathe correctly” or use “stomach support”. You may have been told you need to “stand with good posture”, or that you should “place the larynx” in a certain position. Perhaps you have even been given instructions to “sing from your mask” or “feel as if you are yawning”.

Unfortunately, this well-meaning advice becomes exceptionally limiting – even destructive – for the majority of people trying to improve their singing voices. The reason will become abundantly clear when you watch the FREE VIDEO that you get on this page.

On the other hand, when you engage in a process – a process that you are about to learn here – through which you develop an extraordinary awareness of your body and mind, you can immediately FEEL the restriction your body and mind have unconsciously been holding on to. The beauty is that you also discover how to RELEASE these restrictions.

You FEEL how muscles that used to become engaged in the attempt to produce sound, can now let go. As a result, you can rather immediately sing with more power but with far less effort. Your voice becomes more flexible and your range increases rapidly.

Most importantly, you FEEL good!

Yes, it feels good to sing – just as it should. You also notice that when it feels good it also sounds good, simply because the sound isn’t restricted. And you SING ON KEY with much greater accuracy.

You now not only sound better than ever before, you can now sing with greater passion, in the style you want to sing. And with this newfound confidence and freedom you can truly bond with the audienceNow you become a singer who is attractive and captivating. Now the audience LOVES you.

… in your local choir or band… or when you sing by yourself for your own enjoyment.
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I found these video’s helpful; there are many out there to suited to our personal  interests . As an artist {painter}, as  noted in these  videos, in  expectation  of an  implied  talent.  people often say to me “how do you do that”… No, the  acclimation that talent is innate  may have been be overblown. There is  a lot of  practice, training via self or by an  expert. Admitting to myself to trust and let go, to not be a  champion,  at  will.. Sounds easy?  I have  found ; If   I make  mud out of all  my beautiful  paints–I make mud. Trust yourself. Love mud. Then do something  with  it-step back:  take a trip to the museum and look around  at  all  the mistakes, other  greats   that  you  admire.. Then start asking questions. Just like a child– it is the “why why why”. Looking is a great tool. Feelingly is a  great  tool. Creativity is a  great  tool. Hearing is a great tool.  Although  not equal, we all  possess  these  innately. Even a disability , pronounces itself in another voice. To one extent every gift  vacillates  over on other and each  “endeavor” over another over an other. Trying to do our best and not to be critical is one of  the  tools– I’ve  have had one of the greatest  wrestling matches with. Trying NOT to out think my ‘ intuition’  { what I  think I already know verse what I  don’t know}. What I don’t know is; one of my  greatest  assets { a learning device that  sounds like it has  ricochshaded  to the thousandths}. So  trusting myself when I am ready, when is it time is positive verse putative – the how the “why” can be intra- gated  after the self  interrogation…

…even if sounds like a ‘ learning  element’ that has been consecrated and impounded . Creativity, that has and is a questionable;  thoughtfulness, that keeps re-occurring  {as long as is cognoscente  and it is in an adverbially perspective}.  Feedback,  though  is quite astute in  our  memories.  Regenerate  from others, even with the best of intent, can be difficult and gestational. Perspectives help us sift  through our own filter’s and try to understand other’s.  No small challenge.  I would rather  eat  the  breakfast of  champanions. Cheerios‘s is  Cheerios. Therefore forcing us to value  to what we think or question, commits us to be makers or un -makers of our own  inviability  or the  spinnability of our audience.

Whether is  thought  or action is  congregational,  throughout  yourself,  myself  albeit  friends, a painting, a  memory, a song , a new attempt  of  bringing a  part of  history  albeit  politically antithetic, or a slight kinesthetic action such as shaking someone’s hand- is worth while.

For growth, impairment of even the greatest of our own attributes, is one of our greatest  strengths.

Singing is indeed for everybody

as  writing

as   fashion

as are political speeches.

as are  interpersonal  relationships.

and so forth…

So goes for creativeness.

and  love.

 

Write your first draft with your heart. Re-write with your head.

.

Singing Imageis joyful.

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Should Historians “Mind” What’s Been Said? By mcheesaker

who's word's?

According to Google’s new n-gram tool, when researching history, words count.

Literally.

By analyzing over 500 billion words from 5.2 million books in Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish, the n-gram tool allows users to track the usage of words from 1500AD onwards. The implications of this tool in terms of historical and cultural research are just beginning to come to light. In the article  “Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books,” Jean-Baptiste Michel and his fellow researchers suggest that Google’s n-gram can be used to track the emergence of diseases, state censorship and the relative “celebrity” of a given person.

There is no doubt that the n-gram is, and will continue to be, an extremely useful tool in historical inquiry. However, there are some limitations that need to be addressed.

Firstly, the Google n-gram is limited in regards to language. Most of the collected works are written in English. Although this is helpful for me (an Anglophone student from Canada), some of the world’s most spoken languages, like Arabic and Hindi, are not even present in the database.

Furthermore, as Jean-Baptiste Michel notes, the Google n-gram tool simply measures the frequency of words within books, and books alone. Therefore, other publications like newspapers, and academic journal articles are marginalized from each search. The impact of this becomes quite clear when you compare n-gram searches on Google, and an n-gram search that browses through local newspaper clippings like the site, Mining the Dispatch. On Mining the Dispatch, users are able to see the relative frequency of fugitive slave ads that made it into the local Richmond newspaper during the Civil War. Because of its larger scope, and inability to browse through newspapers, this kind of historical deduction cannot be made through Google’s n-gram.

There is no doubt that the n-gram is, and will continue to be, an extremely useful tool in historical inquiry. However, there are some limitations that need to be addressed.

Firstly, the Google n-gram is limited in regards to language. Most of the collected works are written in English. Although this is helpful for me (an Anglophone student from Canada), some of the world’s most spoken languages, like Arabic and Hindi, are not even present in the database

I think it’s also important to note that language, although an important (and often forgotten) indication of culture is certainly not the only one. As historians know, geography, religion and class, all play a critical role in shaping the thoughts, actions and mindsets of a given people. Language is only one small piece of what makes us who we are.

Indeed, Canada, the United States, and the UK, may all be English speaking nations, but we have very different cultures. Just to prove this point, I decided to gauge the relative frequencies of three major sports: baseball, hockey, and football. From 1900-2008, the frequency of hockey was dismal compared to football and baseball. However, this was a search that took into account all English books written during the designated period. I imagine if I were to search a corpus containing only Canadian books, hockey would be mentioned far more frequently..

But more than that, words themselves are limited.

Think about Twitter. Depending on the words we choose to use in our hashtags, our statuses are more searchable. Similarly, if we tweet about a topic that’s trending, what we say is viewed by a larger audience. But what if we don’t use the right words to categorize what we’re saying? What if we type in an extra “s” or add an apostrophe where it doesn’t belong? But more pertinent than that, what if we say one thing, and mean another?

My previous example with sports provides an interesting example. In English, the word “football” can either mean soccer, or American football. In my search, this discrepancy wasn’t accounted for. Therefore, any mention of the word “football,” whether that book was actually talking about soccer or American football, was nonetheless counted. And therein lies another problem with Google’s n-gram: the tool gives us no sense of context.

And for the historian, context is king.

An old Chinese proverb claims that, “If you wish to know the mind of a man, listen to his words.”

After playing around with the Google n-gram, and uncovering its uses, I think this is extremely accurate. However, words are only one investigative tool in the proverbial historical tool-belt that can be used to understand history and culture.

F0r charts and more information visit: http://hist291.wordpress.com/2013/02/03/should-historians-mind-whats-been-said/

Snow Tiger by YUSEF KOMUNYAKAABY

th - Copy - Copy

Ghost sun half
hidden, where did you go?
There’s always a mother
of some other creature
born to fight for her young.
But crawl out of your hide,
walk upright like a man,
& you may ask if hunger is the only passion
as you again lose yourself
in a white field’s point of view.
In this glacial quiet
nothing moves except—
then a flash of eyes & nerves.
If cornered in your head by cries from a cave
in another season, you can’t forget
in this landscape a pretty horse
translates into a man holding a gun.

Source: Poetry (April 2012).


BIOGRAPHY

In his poetry, Yusef Komunyakaa weaves together the elements of his own life in short lines of vernacular to create complex images of life in his native Louisiana and the jungles of Vietnam. From his humble beginnings as the son of a carpenter, Komunyakaa has traveled far to become a scholar, professor, and prize-winning poet. In 1994, he claimed the Pulitzer Prize and the $50,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for his Neon . . .

Collaborative Songwriting…A Retrospective

folkchris

From the point of view of a self taught (and often solo) musician and songwriter,the prospect of co-writing music and lyrics with other musicians was something that I had to an extent, considered, but never really properly undertaken. 

One of the ‘luxuries’ afforded to the individual in writing to meet his or her own bench mark, is that very much everything from genre to lyrical content is decided by that individual alone.

However, in doing this, while the individual maintains complete control, this approach to ‘musicking’ (Small) neglects the benefits which are present in making music in a group environment.

‘Each songwriter has their own natural songwriting process. Sometimes these processes work very well, but other times, there is very much room for improvement. Co-writing is a great opportunity for you to improve upon your own process by seeing how another approaches the same song- what works and doesn’t work…

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Lost; Get out from under my feet.

Get out from under my feet.

Fire. Passing harmlessly across the screws, tapping oil boiling lichen , garb

ages;

Full of blackened tarred and feather sorrow.( bothersome talk. ) UN -recitalist, unnecessarily rude phone callus. During grief.

Calls foam the burners.

No remorse. No  payment. Careless. Excused: Co-signers my life. Voted. UN- Necessarily.

Tell that to my heart. Bastards. I have to re-do, re-play re-member. rewind.

Garb-ages full of hate and anger.Tears. bags.

Nothing. Just play your tuneful. Ask no Questions.
Shoes or no shoes . What direction, easy when you blows.

One way conversation. ask me no questions tell me no lies.

have a watch OR A M OR HOW ABOUT A roof PM. GLAD BAGS with tie strings. Shot glasses with a straw.

OF NO PICTURES. Hand s with un-even

rings.

profile demounted. Gravitas moves in circulant-

circus, No carnivals, no fairs, no affairs.

don’t call, or ask. Real answers, unknown. Tepidness interrupter pathways to gateaus doors and airport garages aged UN –nest us sorrily. shut-up.

Quotes:Carl Sandburg quotes (American Historian, Poet and Novelist, 1878-1967)

“Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.”

Painting by Heather Whitley Gibson 2000