How To Get A Record Deal

 

Let’s talk about how to get a record deal. After all this is what you want. Right? You’d probably do anything just to get one. One of the most important things that you should focus on is making your music unique. I’ve seen too many artists try to record a song that is almost identical to a particular song they’ve heard on the radio. When it comes to record deals, it just doesn’t work.

All the record labels want is one thing that is uniquely different in your music. That’s all. You know what? You’re already unique. You are different to every other artist, musician and songwriter on the planet. So what do you do? Bring out that uniqueness in your music. Bring out the you in your music. Let your music reflect you. Your songs should capture your unique personality and individuality.

This is how you capture your listener. They will stop and listen because your music takes them to places they have never been before. It’s not the same regurgitated songs that they have grown accustomed to and are tired of. Record label reps are the first listeners and they’re human. Make them stop and listen. This is how artists get record deals.

There are songs that you listen to for the first time and they immediately grab your attention. There is something in them that do that to you, whether it’s a particular kind of melody, something in the lyrics, the topic or whatever. Here’s what you should do. Write songs with the intention of doing the same thing to your listeners. That’s all! Don’t do exactly what was done in the song you heard. Make it different and unique, but make it create the same impact.

Regurgitation doesn’t get artists record deals. It’s uniqueness. Give a record label a song to knock their socks of in the same way that your favorite songs knocked your socks off. As soon as you do this, you’ll be on your way.

Original Post From http://www.ultimatesongwriting.com

 

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Four Quick Fixes for Your Songs

Original Article From http://songwriter101.com

1. Cut your intro in half. One of the most important things to remember if you’re writing songs for the commercial market is how very little time you have to get the listener’s attention. We, as songwriters, necessarily give our songs our full, loving and undivided attention, which is why a long, winding musical intro feels perfectly natural as a way to set the stage for the song to come. The reality, though, is that our listeners rarely give a song they’ve never heard their full attention, which is why you, as the songwriter, have to go and get it. Quickly. A short, to-the-point intro that leads directly into the verse of the song is the first step towards pulling your listener in.

2. Put more concrete details into your verses. The verses in your song are there to, more or less, tell the story. While feelings are an important part of any story, so are the actual details. In other words, give people images to hold on to so they know what your song is about. Since you’re the one writing the song, you already know the story, so it’s easy to forget that your listener doesn’t. While you’re at it, I’m a big believer in the “show ‘em, don’t tell ‘em” approach. This means if you can use an image rather than a long explanation to describe a situation, do it. Whoever wrote “a picture is worth a thousand words” had it right.

3. Your chorus should be what your song is about. In another effort to help you keep the big picture in mind while you’re writing, I’d suggest making sure that your chorus really drives the point of your song home. This is the place where your message becomes clear and memorable. Ideally, the listener should be able to start singing along after they’ve heard your chorus once or twice. Another, less delicate way of putting this is to think of your chorus as the equivalent of tying the theme of your song to a baseball bat and beating the hell out of people with it.

4. Make sure similar sections have similar structures. In general, it’s a good idea to keep similar sections in your song similar in structure. In other words, your first verse should match your second verse in number of lines and rhyme scheme and your choruses should have the same length and lyric. There are always exceptions to this approach but here’s the reasoning behind it: The simpler and clearer your song is, the more memorable it will be. Memorable is a good thing. I’m in no way suggesting not to tackle complex topics or musical themes, I’m simply saying that “complicated” and “different” don’t, in and of themselves, mean success. The real challenge is to tell your story, whatever it may be, in the simplest, most effective way possible.

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After Getting Screwed by One Major Label, Kenny Rogers Runs Into the Arms of Another…

Article From DigitalNews.Com

After an exhaustive listing of alleged abuses spanning decades, Kenny’s legal team settled on a sad assessment, one that unfortunately matches our grim picture of big-label accounting.
This isn’t just an EMI (or Capitol Records) thing: in fact, a string of lawsuits by major-signed superstars have now etched a pattern of systematic dishonesty, all in the name of lowering one huge cost: the artist. That complements lots of troubling tales about broke – and broken – artists who were simply screwed by smarmy label execs and lawyers (and oftentimes, their own collossal mistakes).
It just seems baked into the system. So why is Kenny Rogers now signing with another major, right down the block? On Thursday, Kenny Rogers proudly announced a brand new deal with Warner Music Group (Nashville), specifically through his old-time label, Warner Bros. “Our history together, combined with the incredible team that’s in place now, provides the catalyst for a great new relationship going forward.”
Of course, there are several reasons why this might make sense. For starters, the executives at Warner Nashville may be totally different than Capitol, and the presence of a label frees the burden of doing (or at least overseeing) everything. On top of that, Rogers now has considerable leverage to not only negotiate more favorable terms, but also construct deals that focus on more limited areas (ie, marketing, distribution, etc.)
But this is still Warner Music Group, a company with a legacy of outlandish executive salaries and now-aggressive cost-cutting. And this seems like a golden opportunity: maybe Kenny isn’t Amanda Palmer, but there are plenty of experts that could have shepherded a truly independent, ‘DIY’ career for this legend. Warner, on the other, seems like an ongoing ‘Gamble,’ no matter how good it seems upfront.

More Articles At: Digital News

Grooveshark: Trolling The Sea Of Artists To Make A Buck?

Article From http://blog.tunecore.com

So what does Grooveshark do? When you click the “about” link on their website, a little pop-up box appears that says: “Grooveshark is the world’s largest on-demand music streaming and discovery service.” What this means is that anyone can go to Grooveshark, and, for FREE, type in the name of an artist and then play any recording by that artist in the Grooveshark system. Users can make playlists, stop, start, skip and basically listen to what they want, when they want, with little-to-no restrictions. And guess what, allowing anyone to listen to anything they want with basically no restrictions got them a whole bunch of users. How many? According to their little pop-up box: “Over 30 million users flock to Grooveshark…” Wow. 30 million users that “flock to Grooveshark,” and, again, I quote from their own site: “…to listen to their favorite music, create playlists, discover new tunes, and share it all with friends via Facebook, Twitter, social news sites, and more.” Well, when you have 30 million people coming to your website, you have a lot of web traffic. This means you can start making money by charging entities to advertise on your site. After all, you reach tens of millions of consumers. Just think of all the money Grooveshark makes by selling ads. There is just one really big, big problem: they don’t get licenses and don’t pay the artists, the labels and/or the songwriters for the use of the music that’s making them tons of money. I can assure you, 99% of the hundreds of thousands of TuneCore Artists whose music is in Grooveshark have not been paid a single penny. Said more simply: ARTISTS SHOULD BE PAID FOR THE USE OF THEIR MUSIC! In order for Grooveshark to pull off their “aren’t-we-so-clever-f**k-the-artist” scheme, they use copyright law in a way it was not intended to be used.

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Epiphone Guitars: A History

Straight From http://epiphone.com

Epiphone is one of American’s oldest and most revered instrument makers and since 1873, Epiphone has made instruments for every style of popular music. The name evokes both history and the spirit of invention. Epiphone has been an audible (not to mention visible!) presence in every great musical era from the mandolin craze of the early 1900s to jazz age guitars of the 1920s. From swing era archtops through post-war pop, jazz, r&b, and early rock n’ roll. From the “British Invasion” to heavy metal, punk, grunge, and thrash. And now, in the 21st century, new Epiphone technical breakthroughs such as the ProBucker™ pickup, series parallel switching, built-in KillSwitch™ pots, the Shadow NanoFlex™ and NanoMag™ pickup systems, and premier acoustic/electric guitars with the eSonic™ preamp have brought the historic name to a new generation. The story behind Epiphone’s improbable rise from a small family repair shop to a world-wide leader in the manufacture of quality instruments could easily be transformed into the great American novel. But our story is true. The Epiphone tale begins in the mountains of Greece and threads its way to Turkey, across the Atlantic to the immigrant gateway of Ellis Island, and into the nightclubs, recording studios, and coast-to-coast radio broadcasts of Manhattan in the 1920s and 30s. It’s the story of craftsmanship passed from father to son and the ceaseless American drive for innovation. Just a decade after Epiphone published a 46-page catalogue that included acoustic archtops, flattops, basses, electric guitars, banjos, and amplifiers, the company would be bankrupt and sold to a longtime rival, Gibson. Today, Epiphone is once again an innovator in guitar and instrument manufacturing. The variety of musicians that walk through Epiphone’s history is equally remarkable. Jazz greats like George Van Eps, country pioneers like Hank Garland, bluesman John Lee Hooker, and scores of mandolin, archtop and steel guitar players used Epiphone instruments daily over nationwide broadcasts. There are unlikely heroes and tinkerers in the Epiphone story too, like guitar pioneer Les Paul, who worked nights in the Epiphone factory to create “the Log”, his primordial version of what would eventually be called the “Les Paul.” Beatles’ bassist extraordinaire Paul McCartney choose an Epiphone Casino as his first American made guitar and John Lennon and George Harrison quickly followed. The Casino appeared on every Beatles album from Help through Abey Road. And today, Epiphone can be heard on albums by Gary Clark, Jr., My Chemical Romance, Joe Bonamassa, Zakk Wylde, Machine Head, Dwight Yoakam, The Strokes, Slash, Jeff Waters, Paul Simon, Radiohead, The Waco Brothers, Lenny Kravitz, and Paul Weller. If a time machine could transport today’s Epiphone players to Epiphone’s Manhattan showroom of 60 years ago when it was a gathering place for all the Big Apple’s best players, the generations would agree that Epiphone has always been the House of Stathopoulo, and today is still innovating, still delighting musicians, and still frustrating competitors with daring designs and superb quality. “Epiphone always made a good guitar,” Les Paul once said. And that after all, is what all musicians are looking for.

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“Elvis” Visits Tennessee Governor – March 6, 1961

Reposted From ELVIS.COM

Elvis was honored by the Tennessee State Legislature on March 6, 1961. Elvis showed up looking presidential in a black suit and tie and accepted the title of ‘Honorary Colonel.’ He was escorted by Governor Buford Ellington’s daughter Ann and received a tour of the governor’s mansion. “Elvis Presley Day” was proclaimed by the governor and every year after this, Elvis donated money to a list of Memphis-area charities.